3DTV: Home and the Range

Most people don’t live in movie theaters.  That could be a problem for 3-D TV. It wouldn’t be the first time that TV offered an experience different from that of a cinema auditorium.  In 1961, NBC Saturday Night at the Movies began with the 1953 movie How to Marry a Millionaire, shot in an aspect […]  More

The Hole Thing

Take away a camera’s mount, viewfinder, electronics, optical system (including lens), and case, and what’s left? It’s not “nothing;” it’s a hole. Holes treat light very differently from the way nothing treats light, and the image business is very much involved with light. One of the key effects of holes on light is diffraction. Imagine a […]  More

Walkin' in a Camera Wonderland

If you want to see products that don’t appear in U.S. trade-press magazines, you need to go beyond NAB, SMPTE, and InfoCOMM. You need to go to the International Broadcasting Convention. IBC is my favorite trade show. I can leave work, catch an evening flight to Amsterdam, and take a train directly from the airport […]  More

Angry About Contrast

If you are looking at the above picture on a nominally sized screen at a nominal viewing distance, you probably see an angry man on the left.  What’s an “angry man”?  Me, when I think about technical descriptions of HDTV. Think about it.  Maybe you hear HDTV described as being 1080i or 720p.  Maybe it’s […]  More

Sports, News, Porno, and… Opera?

Electronic slow motion was invented for sports video. Tapeless camcorders were created for TV news. Pornography made streaming video successful.  But something else that seems to drive media-technology innovation is opera.  Really.  Opera. The European Digital Cinema Forum’s 2008 EDCF Guide to Alternative Content for Digital Cinema begins with a chapter on opera because opera happens to […]  More

A Brief History of Height

Based on the basic questions who, when, where, how, and why, HDTV was invented by NHK (Nippon Hoso Kyokai, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation), first shown to the public in 1969 at NHK’s Science & Technical Research Laboratory, initially achieved by using three image tubes to create the picture, and developed because, with real estate at […]  More

3-D for the One-Eyed

Like the earliest movies, early TV was silent.  And the late, great television director Kirk Browning drove an ambulance during World War II.  Believe it or not, this post is about 3-D TV. Sound seems inseparable from video today, but ’twasn’t ever thus.  Writing in the Proceedings of the IRE [the Institute of Radio Engineers] […]  More