Schubin Snacks

Help Fund a Book About Henry Sutton, Television Pioneer

  In 1890, Henry Sutton, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, published the diagram above (minus the annotations) in The Telegraphic Journal and Electrical Review. It was, conceivably, the first viable proposal for a complete television system (this diagram shows only an elevation of the receiver). Was Sutton able to televise the Melbourne Cup race in 1885? Did […]  More

It's the End of an Era, But Which?

  The day after the 100th anniversary of the first meeting of the society that became SMPTE, The New York Times reported on July 25, 2016, on the front page of its business section, on the end of an era. The headline was “Once $50,000. Now, VCRs collect dust.” If only we knew which era […]  More

NAB 2016 Wrap-up

Recorded on May 25, 2016 at the SMPTE DC “Bits by the Bay,” Managing Technologies in Transition at the Chesapeake Beach Resort & Spa. TRT: 33:00 (52 MB) Download link: NAB 2016 Wrap-up Embedded:  More

HDR: The Great, the Okay, and the Yikes!

HDR: The Great, the Okay, and the Yikes! Of all of the picture improvements being discussed today, high dynamic range (HDR) offers the most bang for the bit. It has other characteristics that could also be described as “great.” Implementation will take some work, which is okay. And then there are the parts that are […]  More

Crowded Room, Empty Booth

Yesterday, at the 2016 NAB Show in Las Vegas, the National Association of Broadcasters’ big annual event, I visited “The ATSC 3.0 Consumer Experience” at the southernmost end of the corridor outside the upper level of the South Hall. It’s shown above in an artist’s rendering. It was actually bigger and more crowded, so crowded, […]  More

Ralph Baruch 1923-2016 (and me)

  Ralph Baruch died on Thursday, March 3, 2016, at age 92. A giant of our industry, after escaping the Nazis in Europe, he was a movie-theater usher, an engineer at Empire Broadcasting, and an ad seller for Channel 5 in New York before joining CBS in 1954, heading the newly spun-off Viacom in 1971, […]  More

IEEE Proceedings: Fandom of the Opera

  This one has it all, from toxic candles to quantum entanglement, the story of how opera created the modern media world, with full references. Here’s a free link to the paper, published in the March 2016 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE: The Fandom of the Opera Opera-house-based baseball-playing robots? A 200-ton music synthesizer? “No […]  More

The First Bootleg Recording

  Opera has a long history of bootleg recording. The “Golden Age of Opera” label, begun in the 1950s, used unauthorized off-air recordings from Metropolitan Opera (Met) radio broadcasts. Before that, Wagner-Nichols promoted recorders and recordings of those broadcasts. And Classic Editions issued an opera recording supposedly made in Italy that was, in fact, an […]  More

The Fandom of the Opera at McGill University by Mark Schubin

“The Fandom of the Opera” at McGill University’s Centre for Interdisciplinary Research into Music and Media Technology, by Mark Schubin Electronic home entertainment, movies, consumer headphones – even newscasts and sportscasts – were all created for opera. Really! Emmy-award-winning engineer and historian Mark Schubin offers a brief seminar on “The fandom of the opera: How […]  More

Let's Go Mets!

  As this is being written, the New York Mets are still contenders for the 2015 baseball championship. They won in 1969 and 1986 after having the worst record in 162-game major-league-season history when they first took the field. When the team was founded, it was the Metropolitan Baseball Club of New York, a name […]  More

Where Did The Newscast Come From?

  Where Did The Newscast Come From? SMPTE DC Bits-by-the-Bay, Chesapeake Beach Resort May 20, 2015 Direct Link (16 MB / TRT 8:14): Where Did The Newscast Come From? Embedded:  More