Cartoni Sports 200 Tripod Makes an Impact Down the Home Stretch of the Kentucky Derby

It’s called the most exciting two minutes in sports, and this year’s Kentucky Derby made headlines for more reasons than one. From a controversial decision to disqualify a winner to the first use of Cartoni’s new tripod at a major event, multiple Emmy-award winning camera operator, Deena Sheldon, one of just a handful of women in television productions, captured the action with Cartoni’s new Sports 200 heavy-duty tripod.

“I operated the Super Slo-Mo camera which looked down the home stretch. I listened to the NBC Sports Directors, Drew Esocoff and Pierre Moossa, as the horses came to the finish line. My responsibility was to get a tight shot of the winning jockey and horse,” explained Sheldon. “For me, it starts with a solid foundation that the new Cartoni Sports 200 provided me. Combined with the all-important fluidity of the Cartoni Magnum head, I experienced the utmost confidence and trust in my movements.”

Positioned at one of the many cameras positioned around the track, Sheldon was able to put the Sports 200 to the test. The new Cartoni Sports 200 is a set of tripod legs, designed specifically to meet the rigorous demands of sports and outside broadcast (OB) production. With a unique form factor and the ability to support camera payloads over 400 pounds, the Sports 200 is designed to make set up quick and easy.

“The Cartoni Sports 200 was the easiest tripod I have ever set up. It’s lightweight, solid and easy to adjust for leveling. The numbers and lines on each leg provided an excellent way to adjust for leveling. The perfectly placed supportive vertical rods made for an easy way to secure the tripod in the location,” added Sheldon. “Did I mention that it looks great, too?”

The Sports 200 is constructed using Duralumin, a lightweight and durable material used to build aircraft, while the unique form creates exceptional torsional rigidity – a feature particularly important for precise movements.

“The Sports 200 is great for precise movements. It’s extremely stable and strong. There’s no flexing or slipping,” said Sheldon.

Sheldon has a long history of working high profile events. From the Super Bowl to Sunday Night Football, she represents one of the approximately 6% of women working in sports production. She credits her success to being prepared.

“I believe in having a good work ethic: practicing, preparation, studying and embracing new technology. When the percentage of women in television production averages around 6%, then I try to be the best I can to represent that 6%.”